Newsletter Archive


Holiday family get-togethers can be stressful. All of those old childhood wounds can get reopened, and, in some families, new issues are created. Even in families that appear to get along, unvoiced resentments from the past can linger behind a mask of normalcy. You can relax and enjoy your family this holiday season with a few simple tips.


One of the most potent attacks that our mind can bring against us is unforgiveness. Left undealt with, it will strangle personal freedom and life. Many of us have gone or are going through some horrendous experiences. You have been hurt, you have experienced deep wounds, and many of you have been abused. I am not attempting to justify those who have hurt you or attempt to make light of the experiences. Forgiveness does not mean forgetting or excusing offences. The truth is, if you do not choose forgiveness - a willingness to release resentment - you will be limited in having healthy emotional responses.  When we lose sight of the good things and become focused on the offense, it begins to deteriorate our healthy self.


Managing Holiday Stress

November 30, 2018

Holidays can be a particularly stressful time for everyone. There’s the cleaning and decorating to do, the relatives and friends to invite, the menus to plan, the cookies and cakes to bake, the gifts to buy and wrap, and the children to get dressed. Under these conditions, who wouldn’t feel stressed?


Holidays and Kids

November 30, 2018

The over-the-top nature of the holidays can be a lot of fun, but can easily become too much. While many may get stressed out by all of the parties and plans, kids can be downright overwhelmed. Before you know it, the most wonderful time of the year has turned into a time of meltdowns and misery—for them and for you. But you can help your child find a calmer way of dealing with the holidays, making things more fun for both of you.


Holidays and Grief

November 28, 2018

Christmas and other holidays may be times of joy and celebration; an occasion to reunite with loved ones and to share traditions and good times...for some people. However, there are situations that can make this season extremely hard for other people. It may be distance (physical or emotional), it may be a break-up, the loss of employment, a divorce, and many other situations which may make Christmas not such a merry time for many. So, how can we help somebody who is grieving and going through a tough time these days?


Many people never experience high self-worth or feel high self-esteem. People with low self-esteem tend to think they have little worth and have a negative view of almost everything. But what if low self-esteem was meant to tell you something?


Emotions like anger do not just go away on their own. We can no more stop feeling angry than we can stop feeling love or affection. Some people turn anger against themselves by eating or drinking, some people turn it against others verbally or physically, and some people bury it inside. It’s not the anger itself that’s a problem, but the inability to deal with it effectively and constructively.


Chris’ Story (Strive)

October 15, 2018

In November 2016, Chris was found trying to commit suicide and was taken to the hospital. That is when Chris contacted The Family Centre and began seeing a counsellor every week. Chris learned that he had developed PTSD because of abandonment issues “It was remarkable, The Family Centre really helped me ‘flick the switch’.”


Our brain functions are not set in stone by any particular age; they can change across our entire lifetime. In other words, you can heal from early adversity, even if it’s taken a real toll on you. Here are a few things to consider trying throughout your journey towards healing:


Whether you’re studying for a class, assisting your child with his or her homework, or learning a new hobby, you might need to boost your learning habits. The best thing about this guide is it can be applied to any situation!